Coolbellup Library closed for renovations 27 May – 16 June 2024 Read more!

HomeLatest news for AdultsAdult books, movies & musicAdult fictionLiterary Dragons: A Reading List to celebrate the Year of the Dragon

Coolbellup Library closed for renovations 27 May – 16 June 2024 Read more!

HomeLatest news for AdultsAdult books, movies & musicAdult fictionLiterary Dragons: A Reading List to celebrate the Year of the Dragon

Coolbellup Library closed for renovations 27 May – 16 June 2024 Read more!

HomeLatest news for AdultsAdult books, movies & musicAdult fictionLiterary Dragons: A Reading List to celebrate the Year of the Dragon

Coolbellup Library closed for renovations 27 May – 16 June 2024 Read more!

HomeLatest news for AdultsAdult books, movies & musicAdult fictionLiterary Dragons: A Reading List to celebrate the Year of the Dragon

The Chinese New Year, also known as the Spring Festival or Lunar New Year, is a centuries-old celebration marking the beginning of the lunar calendar. The festivities typically last for 15 days, culminating in the Lantern Festival. Families come together to honour their ancestors, share meals, exchange gifts, and set off fireworks to ward off evil spirits. Each year is associated with one of the twelve zodiac animals, and 2024 marks the Year of the Dragon.

Lunar New Year begins on 10 February 2024 – GONG XI FA CAI!

The Dragon’s Symbolism:

In Chinese culture, the Dragon is a symbol of power, strength and good fortune. The dragon is a revered creature, embodying strength, courage and good luck. Those born in the Year of the Dragon (1964, 1976, 1988, 2000 and 2012) are believed to be innovative, passionate, charismatic, and lucky people. The dragon’s significance extends beyond Chinese mythology, influencing various aspects of Chinese culture, from art and literature to martial arts.

Dragons in Fiction:

The allure of dragons has captivated storytellers for centuries, transcending cultural boundaries. Dragons often serve as powerful and enigmatic beings in mythology and fiction. In Western literature, dragons are frequently depicted as formidable foes, hoarding treasures and challenging valiant heroes. In contrast, Chinese dragons are seen as benevolent, bringing rain and prosperity.

 

What does the dragon symbolise?

  • Power: Dragons often symbolise strength and power in fiction, embodying the untamed forces of nature.
  • Mythical Guardians: In many cultures, dragons are portrayed as guardians of sacred places or treasures, adding a mystical element to their character.
  • Metaphors for Challenges: Dragons can represent personal or societal challenges that characters must overcome, providing a metaphorical journey for the protagonist.
  • Cultural Richness: Exploring dragons in fiction allows for the rich integration of cultural elements, showcasing diverse perspectives on these mythical creatures.

Suggested reading to celebrate the Year of the Dragon:

Link to Catalogue record for Fourth wing
Link to Catalogue record for Iron flame
Link to Catalogue record for Brothers of the wind
Link to Catalogue record for The alchemist in the shadows
Link to Catalogue record for The dragon's promise
Link to Catalogue record for Guards! Guards!
Link to Catalogue record for A day of fallen night
Link to Catalogue record for Dragonquest
Link to Catalogue record for Highfire
Link to Catalogue record for Rivers of London. Here be dragons
Link to Catalogue record for Blood of an exile
Link to Catalogue record for City of dragons