Cock-a-doodle-doo

Happy Chinese New Year

Image by PixEasy. CC0 – public domain.

Chinese New Year marks the first day of the New Year in the Chinese calendar. Each Chinese New Year is associated with an animal name for one of twelve animals in the Chinese zodiac. The rooster is the tenth animal and the only bird included in the Chinese zodiac. People who are born in the Year of the Rooster are said to be courageous, talkative and confident. In 2017, Chinese New Year falls on Saturday, January 28, and marks the start of the Year of the Rooster. Red envelopes with money inside (Hong Bao, Ang Pao or Lai See) are often given to children as a present to celebrate the start of the Chinese New Year. I have chosen to mark the occasion with a rooster themed Storytime!

Books

Kip by Christina Booth

As soon as Kip hatched, Mrs Bea knew he was special. But when Kip discovers his crow, the neighbours are not so happy! Each cock-a-doodle-doo gets bigger and noisier than the one before it. Mr James can’t sleep, Grandma gets quite a fright, Mrs Piper can’t get Baby Piper to sleep and Mr Hill can’t concentrate on his writing. What can Mrs Bea do? This award-winning picture book is perfect for getting children to have some fun cock-a-doodle-dooing along with Kip.

Rooster’s Off to See the World by Eric Carle

 One fine morning, a rooster sets out to see the world. Along the way, he is joined by two cats, three frogs, four turtles and five fish. But by nightfall, when it begins to get dark, the animals wonder what is for dinner and where will they sleep? The turtles feel cold and the fish are afraid. Rooster had not thought about food and shelter for the trip. So group by group the animals head for home. And the rooster realises that he is cold and hungry and homesick too. So the rooster also turns around and heads for home. That night he has a wonderful and happy dream – all about a trip around the world! Eric Carle wrote this story for children who have difficulty recognising numbers as specific symbols and for all children who are learning about numbers.

Surfer Chick by Kristy Dempsey

This is the story of a sassy chick and her dad who take to the beach so that she can learn how to surf. But it’s harder to surf than she thought and she struggles to stay on her rad pink surfboard. Luckily Rooster is on hand to show his chick the way of the surf. With cool surf lingo and rhyming text this comical picture book makes for a great read aloud. Chick practised, then … Bummer! A breaker arose, that ruffled her feathers and tangled her toes. The bright, expressive and funny illustrations add enormously to its appeal. A great summer read that captures the love between a father and his daughter.

A Rhyme or Two

Image by Pexels. CC0 – public domain.

 

Good Morning, Mr. Rooster

Good morning.
(Indicate a rising sun by making a circle over your head with your arms)
Good morning.
(With arms over your head, lean to one side)
Good morning to you.
(With arms over your head, lean to the other side. Then, point out towards a friend)
Good morning,
(Make a circle over your head with your arms)
Mr. Rooster.
(With your fingers spread wide, touch your thumb to your forehead, representing a rooster’s comb)
Cock-a-doodle-doo.
(Flap your elbows like a rooster’s wings)
Good morning.
Good morning.
Good morning to you.
Good morning,
Mr. Rooster.
Cock-a-doodle-doo.
Cock-a-doodle-doo, Cock-a-doodle-doo, Cock-a-doodle-doo!
(Flap your elbows like a rooster’s wings)
Good morning to you!

Old MacDonald

Old MacDonald had a farm E-I-E-I-O
And on his farm he had a rooster E-I-E-I-O
With a cock-a-doodle-doo here,
And a cock-a-doodle-doo there,
Here a cock-a-doodle-doo, there a cock-a-doodle-doo
Everywhere a cock-a-doodle-doo
Old MacDonald had a farm E-I-E-I-O

Craft Idea

Make a paper plate rooster.

Method:

Fold a large paper plate in half. Use a permanent marker to draw an eye on one side of your paper plate and colour this same side using crayon. On a piece of red card, trace around your child’s hand and cut out. Tape this to the back of the folded paper plate to make the rooster’s comb. Also on the red card cut out the shape of a rain drop for the rooster’s wattle. You will need some orange card to cut out a beak and some feet for your rooster. On a piece of coloured paper (I chose green) trace around your child’s hand again – this second hand template will be the rooster’s tail. Tape the rooster’s beak, wattle and tail feathers inside the paper plate. Attach the rooster’s feet to some wool using tape and then tape the other end of the wool inside the paper plate to make the rooster’s legs. Glue or tape the two halves of the plate together.

Did You Know?

The Magical Rooster by Li Jian

The City of Cockburn Library service has a collection of children’s books written in Chinese. The Magical Rooster is one of the books in this collection.

And Remember:

Reading for pleasure is the most important indicator of the future success of a child. Happy reading! And happy Chinese New Year too.

Image by GDJ. CC0 – public domain.